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20121010
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
fadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," october 4th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. well, tonight, there may be a secret cash cow parked in your driveway. because that old car may actually be worth thousands of dollars more than you think. when it comes to selling your own car, some quick, easy, do it yourself tips could help you increase the price, and there's a lot more to it than just hanging up a gas station air freshener in there. abc's sharyn alfonsi brings us the best strategy for selling your old wheels. >> reporter: meet the gross family. brian, his wife lauren, dog layla and that's their baby, who often gets into the car through the trunk. doesn't take long to figure out why they need to sell their car. >> it's a disaster. >> reporter: so, if your wife wanted to get in here she would have to sit like this, right? she would have to be, like, in the fetal position. the blue book value for the car is $9,000, but a local car dealer offered him four. he thinks it's worth more. so, brian is trying to sell it himself, putting up signs, listing it online at auto t
city, this is "nightline," october 5th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. you might find them going door to door in a neighborhood near ewe. young men in shirts and ties, hoping to convert people to the church of jesus christ of latter day saints. one of the fastest growing religions in the world. this work is part of a demanding two-year right of passage, a journey once taken by mitt romney. abc's bob woodruff brings us this look inside. [ knocking ] >> hi, how are you doing today? >> we're missionaries from the church -- >> reporter: the two-year mission is a right of passage for most young mormon men. >> have you ever seen missionaries in this neighborhood before? >> reporter: there are 55,000 missionaries, serving around the world. and the church allowed our team rare access into their world for two days. of door knocking, teaching -- >> called the vision of the tree of life. >> reporter: and community service. >> i am a mormon. >> i'm a mormon. >> reporter: mormons have never been so visible. while mitt romney's presidential candidacy may have ushered in a mormon moment i
fadden and bill weir in new york city, this is a special edition of "nightline," one-on-one, the candidates debate, october 3rd, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. tonight, a high stakes showdown as president barack obama and mitt romney took the stage in denver to go head to head for the first time. an estimated 60 million americans tuned in to watch this critical moment in an often contentious presidential campaign with the election just 34 days away. crucial swing voters still undecided. with romney trailing in the polls, time running short, tonight could be his turning point. here's how it went down. they came out, shook hands, ready for the main event. but president obama began soft, very soft. a shoutout to the first lady. >> i just want to wish, sweetie, you happy anniversary and let you know that a year from now, we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. >> romney graciously followed suit with an easy quip. >> congratulations to you, mr. president, on your anniversary. i'm sure this was the most romantic place you could imagine, here with me. >> reporter: and then t
as a pump operator for the city and her mother a homemaker to the hall was princeton, where her parents proudly sacrificed so she and her brother could get an ivy league education. >> i choke up when i talk about this stuff because it is why we're here. >> reporter: needless to say her own daughters inhabit a much different world. sasha is now 11 and malia, a teenager. it's hard enough to be 14 if your parents aren't the president and first lady. how do you help her negotiate that real lly frenc lly teachery of 14? >> we don't do the oh, woe is me thing, she's got a great life, she's got great friends, she's happy. it's kind of hard, especially as we point out, look around. you want to see hardship? you want to see struggle? you don't have it, kid, having the president as your father way down on the list of tough. just like, you'll be fine. >> reporter: she often refers to herself as mom in chief she comes to the role with a high-powered pedigree, graduate of harvard law school he ultimately walked way from her career so her husband could pursue his political ambitions. >> i'm his bigge
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)